Flamingo image wins Bird Photographer of the Year

BBC Wildlife Magazine contributor is awarded top prize in a prestigious photography competition. 

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Bird Photographer of the Year winning image, 'Pink Flamingo'

Bird Photographer of the Year winning image, 'Pink Flamingo' © Alejandro Prieto Rojas 

 

The winning and shortlisted images of Bird Photographer of the Year (BPOTY) 2017 have been revealed.

‘Pink Flamingo’ by Alejandro Prieto Rojas is the overall winner.  

“Congratulations must go to Alejandro for his sublime image of flamingos, an incredible balance of colour, composition and emotion,” says head judge Chris Packham.

Rojas’ winning image was published in the November 2017 issue of BBC Wildlife Magazine

 

The winning image appeared in BBC Wildlife Magazine's November 2016 issue

 

“The standard of photography was extremely high and myself and the other judges were treated to some fantastic bird photographs,” Packham adds.

Ondrej Pelanek’s image of a whiskered tern won the Young BPOTY award. 

 

Young Bird Photographer of the Year © Ondrej Pelanek

 

BPOTY is a partnership between the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and Nature Photographers Ltd (NPL) and is only in its second year.

NPL’s Rob Read says, “Following the success of our first year, I must admit to being a little apprehensive about being able to follow it up in year two.

“But I needn’t have worried, the consensus from the judges was that the entries for 2017 surpassed the heights achieved in 2016, quite a feat.”

The awards ceremony will take place at Rutland Birdfair in the main events marquee on 19 August at 4.15pm.

 

How you can enter BPOTY 2018

Have you got an amazing image of a bird? The 2018 competition will be open for entries from midnight on 19 August until 30 November 2017.

There are seven categories and the top prize wins £5,000.

The money raised from both the entry fees and sales of the book is used by the BTO. 

Click here to view all the winning and shortlisted images

 

Read more wildlife news stories in BBC Wildlife Magazine

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